"How To Deal" with psychotherapist and poet Genya Turovsky

HOW TO DEAL

With psychotherapist and poet Genya Turovsky

7pm, Thursday, Dec 15
Badlands Unlimited
24 Rutgers


This event is free. Space is limited. RSVP at [email protected]com

Join us for an evening with psychotherapist and poet Genya Turovsky to talk about self-care and mental well being in the age of political madness. As protests and other forms of activism begin to take shape, how does one cultivate those inner resources one needs to not feel so burdened or anxious? How does one recognize depression, anxiety, and other mental states that contribute to feelings of emotional and political disempowerment? And are there ways to maintain, and even increase, some semblance of composure, resilience, even courage, for one self in the face of the current political situation?


Turovsky will talk about her experience as a certified therapist and offer some insight into these and other questions.

Genya Turovsky (Turovskaya
) is a poet, translator, and psychotherapist. She received her clinical training at NYU, the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Fifth Avenue Center for Psychotherapy. She has post graduate training in Relational psychoanalytic theory and practice from the Stephen Mitchell Center for Relational Studies and in Somatic Experiencing, a trauma treatment modality. She is in private practice in New York City. She is the author of Calendar (Ugly Duckling Presse), The Tides (Octopus Books), New Year's Day (Octopus Books), and Dear Jenny (Supermachine). Her original poetry and translations of contemporary Russian poets have appeared in Chicago Review, Conjunctions, A Public Space, Octopus, jubilat, Gulf Coast, Asymptote, PEN Poetry, Fence, and other publications. Her translation of Aleksandr Skidan's Red Shifting was published by Ugly Duckling Presse in 2008. She is the co-translator (with Stephanie Sandler) of Elena Fanailova's The Russian Version (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2010) which won the University of Rochester's Three Percent 2010 award for Best Translated Book of Poetry. She is also a co-translator of Arkadii Dragomoshchenko's Endarkenment: Selected Poems (Wesleyan, 2014).